(Italiano)


(Italiano)

(Italiano)



(Italiano)


Tuesday 15 December 2015
 
Burundi. Community microcredit and strengthening of the cooperative system

In June 2015 a new project has began in the Ruyigi province, co-financed by Friuli venezia Giulia Region and supported by our friends in the AMU office in Trieste. An article by Jérôme Nibaruta of CASOBU, our counterparty in Burundi.

The project follows a prior one which finished at the end of 2013. After the end of the previous project we continued to stay in contact with some beneficiaries and we witnessed that the project has indeed contributed to improve their financial situation, especially in the agricultural sector. “This year we have had a good yield from our crop due to the fact that we were able to buy without difficulties seeds and organic fertilizer”, a beneficiary has told us. And then a few days ago Joel Butoyi, another beneficiary from the district of Butezi, has surprised us saying: “The project of Community Microcredit has come the reunite the hearts of those who were lost. Now we can all work for the interest of each other, whereas before we worked just for ourselves.”

Let’s go back to June of the current year. One year after the suspension of the activities we realized that not only the project has never really ended, but it also expanded to new beneficiaries that were willing to join as well. “In fact, the operators present on the territory with me, explains Augustin Ndikumama, continued to stay in contact with the beneficiaries and it was natural to continue to be at their service.”

Assuredly the project has started again in Ruyigi with a new energy, and a spirit of mutuality from the beneficiaries that requires all of our attention. First of all, we contacted the 30 saving and credit group from the previous project. Surprisingly, we found 40 groups instead of 30. What has happened? The members of the groups had received interest from other people willing to join. They responded in their own way: those more familiar with the procedures provided the basic notions; some groups split up so that in each group there were people more expert together with the new beneficiaries. They shared the material that they had received beforehand. This spontaneous sharing has to be supported in order to give to the new groups a solid and correct training, necessary for the good functioning of the group itself and to avoid negative effects on the pre-existing ones. A new challenge attends us and a new approach is vital to valorise at best the enormous availability of the beneficiaries.

Source: AMU News n. 3/2015

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